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Home Reviews, opinions Satyajit Ray Memorial Award at the 10th Asian Film Festival Mumbai (22-29.12.11) given to Dr. Shyamala Vanarase
Friday, 17 February 2012 00:00

Satyajit Ray Memorial Award at the 10th Asian Film Festival Mumbai (22-29.12.11) given to Dr. Shyamala Vanarase
 
Satyajit Ray Memorial Award for Cultivation Film Culture among Students had given to Dr. Shyamala Vanarase, Indian film-logist.
 
Satyajit Ray Memorial Award for promoting film as an Art form is given to an Individual dedicated to promoting film culture as the lifetime mission.
 
The 10th Third Eye Asian Film Festival takes pleasure in bestowing the annual Satyajit Ray Memorial Award on Dr. Shyamala Vanarase 2011 year.
Dr. Shyamala Vanarase is essentially an academician. But, having come from a cultural family of Pune, she took interest in art and culture since her young days as a performing artiste. At a time when in most Indian homes films were looked down upon, Vanarase’s farther, himself a photographer, put no bar on films and encouraged his children to watch them. But Dr. Shyamala Vanarase’s active interest in film as an art form began only in 1975, thanks to Prof. Satish Bahadur, who was then heading the Film and Television Institute of India, Pune, Prof. Bahadur’s analyses of films like Pather Panchali, Rashomon, Wild Strawberries, Citizen Kane and Hiroshima Mon Amour so inspired her that she discovered for the first time an art form around which a film is made.
 
At the same time, she realized that, whether creating Art or receiving it, the psychological implications of cinema are huge. Her study in this field reveals that films influence the viewrs at different psychological levels-the sensory-perceptual level, the concept formation level and the values-imitation level and this happens even as films are views as ‘pastime’. As she had already been involved in the work of Parent Teacher Association of Maharashtra in Pune, she initiated film activities for adults and children. For one year she made film viewing and discussion program in the Bhave School for the 8th and the 9th grade students a permanent program. She also assisted Prof. Bahadur in conducting a U.G.C. program for college teachers to equip them to run campus film societies. It is interesting to note that her interest in Indian films was revived after she saw Satyajit Ray’s Seemabaddha, Pratidvwadwi, Mahanagar. While studying the stories Ray chose for his films which spread over a century over a century and a half, from mid-19th to late 20th century, gave her an insight into the Indian society of the time that was undergoing almost traumatic changes. That led her to write a book in Marathi called Satyajit Ray and Bharatiya Manvantar, which was published in 2010.
 
Dr. Vanarase believes that since good films of the world are now available on DVD’s and in internet, this is conductive to a healthy film culture only if adequate steps are taken to cultivate discerning audiences. She herself is a part of this initiative now.

 

Info from Catalogue 10th Asian film festival Mumbai, 22-29.2011